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John D. Luker, DDS
997 Clocktower Drive
Springfield, Illinois 62704
(217) 546-8330

 

 



Posts for tag: dental implants

By Luker Dental Care
November 06, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  

If you have lost one, some or all your teeth, dental implants may be your tooth replacement solution. Your dentist, Dr. John Luker, provides patients these modern prosthetics in his West Springfield, IL, office. Patients recover their oral function, appearance and self-confidence. Let Luker Dental Care show you how dental implants could benefit you.

What is a dental implant?

A dental implant is a medical device made of natural titanium. Screw-shaped, it replaces a real tooth root after dental extraction, providing support for a metal post and customized porcelain crown.

In his West Springfield, IL, office, your dentist also places multiple dental implants for patients who need bridgework or full or partial dentures. These prosthetics provide natural biting and chewing, and they avoid the facial changes and speech slurring so common with conventional tooth replacements.

What are their other benefits?

The benefits are numerous, but the most important is osseointegration. As soon as your dentist inserts your implant into your jaw, it begins bonding to the bone. This slow but sure process takes months, but it ensures a strong and stable anchor for your crown, or in the case of several implants, your denture.

Most patients report their implants feel totally natural. Plus, they appear just like your other healthy teeth.

Can I receive dental implants?

Your exam and X-ray scans will tell you and Dr. Luker if you are. You need enough bone in your jaw to support implant screws. You should be in good overall health.

Plus, it helps to be a non-smoker. Tobacco often degrades implant sites quickly, causing peri-implantitis, an infection similar to advanced gum disease.

How can I keep my implants for life?

The Institute for Dental Implant Awareness (IDIA) says most dental implants function for decades. However, good oral hygiene habits at home and dental care in our dental office--are key.

Be sure to address any problems you have with teeth clenching and grinding. Dr. Luker can recommend a bite guard to protect your teeth at night.

Making the decision

If you'd like to pursue the benefits of dental implants, phone Dr. John Luker at Luker Dental Care for an in-depth consultation. Your dentist will give you the information you need to decide what's best for your smile. Phone us in West Springfield, IL, at (217) 546-8330.

WhatYouShouldKnowAboutAntibioticTherapyBeforeImplantSurgery

Placing a dental implant within the jawbone requires a surgical procedure. For most people it’s a relatively minor affair, but for some with certain health conditions it might be otherwise. Because of their condition they might have an increased risk for a bacterial infection afterward that could interfere with the implant’s integration with the bone and lead to possible failure.

To lower this risk, dentists for many years have routinely prescribed an antibiotic for patients considered at high-risk for infection to take before their implant surgery. But there’s been a lively debate among health practitioners about the true necessity for this practice and whether it’s worth the possible side effects that can accompany taking antibiotics.

While the practice still continues, current guidelines now recommend it for fewer health conditions. The American Dental Association (ADA) together with the American Heart Association (AHA) now recommend antibiotics only for surgical patients who have prosthetic heart valves, a history of infective endocarditis, a heart transplant or certain congenital heart conditions.

But patients with prosthetic joint replacements, who were once included in the recommendation for pre-surgical antibiotics, are no longer in that category. Even so, some orthopedic surgeons continue to recommend it for their joint replacement patients out of concern that a post-surgical infection could adversely affect their replaced joints.

But while these areas of disagreement about pre-surgical antibiotics still continue, a consensus may be emerging about a possible “sweet spot” in administering the therapy. Evidence from recent studies indicates just a small dose of antibiotics administered an hour before surgery may be sufficient to reduce the risk of infection-related implant failure with only minimal risk of side effects from the drug.

Because pre-surgical antibiotic therapy can be a complicated matter, it’s best that you discuss with both the physician caring for your health condition and your dentist about whether you should undergo this option to reduce the infection risk with your own implant surgery. Still, if all the factors surrounding your health indicate it, this antibiotic therapy might help you avoid losing an implant to infection.

If you would like more information on antibiotics before implant surgery, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Implants & Antibiotics: Lowering Risk of Implant Failure.”

YourHealthCouldAffecttheLongevityofaDentalImplant

There’s a lot to like about dental implants for replacing missing teeth. Not only are they life-like, but because they replace the root they also function much like a natural tooth. They also have another unique benefit: a track record for long-lasting durability. It’s estimated more than 95% of implants survive at least ten years, with a potential longevity of more than 40 years.

But even with this impressive record, we should still look at the few that didn’t and determine the reasons why they failed. We’ll soon find that a great number of those reasons will have to do with both oral and general health.

For example, implants rely on adequate bone structure for support. Over time bone cells grow and adhere to the implant’s titanium surface to create the durable hold responsible for their longevity. But if conditions like periodontal (gum) disease have damaged the bone, there might not be enough to support an implant.

We may be able to address this inadequacy at the outset with a bone graft to encourage growth, gaining enough perhaps to eventually support an implant. But if bone loss is too extensive, it may be necessary to opt for a different type of restoration.

Slower healing conditions caused by diseases like diabetes, osteoporosis or compromised immune systems can also impact implant success. If healing is impeded after placement surgery the implant may not integrate well with the bone. An infection that existed before surgery or resulted afterward could also have much the same effect.

Oral diseases, especially gum disease, can contribute to later implant failures. Although the implant’s materials won’t be affected by the infection, the surrounding gum tissues and bone can. An infection can quickly develop into a condition known as peri-implantitis that can weaken these supporting structures and cause the implant to loosen and give way. That’s why prompt treatment of gum disease is vital for an affected implant.

The bottom line: maintaining good oral and general health, or improving it, can help keep your implant out of the failure column. Perform daily brushing and flossing (even after you receive your implant) and see your dentist regularly to help stop dental disease. Don’t delay treatment for gum disease or other dental conditions. And seek medical care to bring any systemic diseases like diabetes under control.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants: A Tooth-Replacement Method that Rarely Fails.”

November 07, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  

Missing teeth are not just an aesthetic problem. They're a functional problem too. They make it difficult to chew, bite, or speak properly and Dental Implantcontribute to jawbone shrinkage. Dental implants from our Springfield dentist, Dr. John Luker at Luker Dental Care can restore your smile.

Here are some FAQs about dental implants:
 

What are dental implants?

Dental implants are the posts which support artificial teeth. Designed like a screw, a dental implant is secured under the gum and into the jaw bone, acting as the root of the tooth. The implant is permanent and is topped with an artificial tooth made to match the color and shape of your natural tooth. Dental implants are suitable for replacing single or multiple teeth.
 

What does the procedure consist of?

The dentist first places the titanium post in the area of the missing tooth. The surgical area is sealed and left for about 3-6 months so the dental implant can bond with the jawbone.

Once the implant has bonded, you will come back to our office, and the dentist will place an abutment on top of the implant and then place a crown that matches the rest of your teeth over the abutment. You're done and ready to enjoy a rejuvenated smile.
 

What are the advantages of dental implants?

One of the biggest reasons people prefer dental implants to dentures is permanence. Dentures require removal for cleaning, soaking and sleeping. Because they are designed to be taken in and out, dentures can move around in your mouth and make eating or talking harder.

Dental implants are easier to care for. You can brush and floss them like natural teeth, and they remain securely in your mouth. Dental implants are undetectable, blending in beautifully with your natural teeth.
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Who should I contact?

For more information about dental implants from our Springfield, IL, dentist Dr. John Luker, don't hesitate to contact Luker Dental Care. Call (217) 546-8330 today.

WithProperManagementDentalImplantscanbeaRealityforDiabetics

Many people with diabetes are hesitant about getting dental implants because they’re under the impression their chances of failure are greater than for non-diabetics. But if you’re one of the 26 million Americans with diabetes, that isn’t necessarily so — with a little extra precaution before, during and after implant surgery.

Diabetes is a group of diseases that affect how the body processes glucose. This simple sugar is used by the body to provide energy to cells, but can also cause damage if its volume level in the bloodstream is too high. The body normally regulates this through the hormone insulin produced by the pancreas.

The pancreas in people with Type 1 diabetes doesn’t produce insulin and so they must receive an outside source of the hormone through daily injections with careful daily monitoring of glucose levels. Those with Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease, don’t produce a sufficient amount of insulin or the body no longer responds to the insulin produced. For either type, abnormal glucose levels — either too high or too low — can have adverse affects on the body, including blindness, nerve damage, gangrene, coma or death.

Diabetes can also slow wound healing, increase the risk of infection, and alter the body’s inflammatory response, all of which are major concerns when placing implants. Because implant placement involves minor surgery in which a wound results, there’s been wide concern that a slower healing process could increase the risk of implant failure.

Recent studies, though, are encouraging especially for patients who have their diabetes under control through medication, diet and exercise. Patients with poor glucose control are at higher risk, because it can take longer for the bone to heal around an implant after placement. For such individuals special considerations to guard against infection may be needed during implant surgery.

In fact, the implant success rate for most diabetics is about the same as for non-diabetic patients, 95%. With proper disease management and a little extra wound care, you can be among the many that experience a favorable outcome and a more attractive smile with dental implants.

If you would like more information on diabetes and dental care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.